"I have a mind like a steel... uh... thingy." Patrick Logan's weblog.

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Thursday, November 01, 2007

Reliabilty with Erlang

Steve Vinoski's announces his latest column...

My latest column, Reliability with Erlang, first describes some of the problems that highly-reliable systems face, and then explains some of Erlang’s core primitives that provide a solid foundation for reliable systems...

BTW, I can’t recommend enough that you pick up a copy of Joe Armstrong’s Programming Erlang. It’s a truly excellent book that has deeply and positively affected the way I think about designing, building, and implementing software systems. As I mentioned in my columns, my only disappointment with Erlang is that I didn’t discover it 10 years ago when it was first open-sourced, as it could have saved me a ton of time and trouble in my middleware development efforts over the years.

From the column itself...
Layered on top of the Erlang language is a framework called the Open Telecom Platform (OTP), which uses these features to help enable reliable systems. Despite the word “telecom” in its name, OTP is a general-purpose framework that’s useful for applications in a variety of domains.

I want to make it clear that Erlang and OTP aren’t magical — they won’t automatically make your software extremely reliable. Creating reliable systems with Erlang/OTP still requires knowledge, experience, solid code, thorough testing, and general attention to detail. Nevertheless, because the language was designed with reliability as a foremost concern, the combination of Erlang and OTP definitely has advantages over other common languages when it comes to reliable systems...

If you develop enterprise-integration or middleware applications that require high reliability, I’ll offer the same advice I gave last time: go get yourself a copy of Joe Armstrong’s book, Programming Erlang.1 This book is very readable and is suitable for both beginners and experts alike. It will open your eyes to a better way of building reliable software.

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Portland, Oregon, United States
I'm usually writing from my favorite location on the planet, the pacific northwest of the u.s. I write for myself only and unless otherwise specified my posts here should not be taken as representing an official position of my employer. Contact me at my gee mail account, username patrickdlogan.